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Vogue

In 1957, Duffy took 5 or 6 of his photos between two sheets of paper and walked into Vogue studios. Duffy met with Audrey Withers – Editor of British Vogue between 1940-1960 – who promptly hired him.

After 3 months working for Vogue, Duffy was sent to photograph German composer Otto Klemperer who insisted to be photographed with a Leica camera. This was due to the quiet mechanism as Klemperer did not want to have any distractions whilst composing. Duffy had never used or owned a Leica before and shot 36 exposures. Klemperer kindly informed him as he was leaving that the lens cap had been on the entire time.

Thinking he was going to be immediately fired, Duffy was called in see Miss Withers that afternoon who informed him that his film had been spoiled in the darkroom. The technicians had covered for him so he seized the opportunity and held his position at Vogue under contract until 1962, then for 15 more years freelance until 1977.

Along with Donovan and Bailey, Duffy is credited with bringing a sense of realism to the pages of the glossy magazines; breaking down the stiff, upper-class images by changing the visual landscape with dynamic, in your face photography. This new style paved the way for the swinging sixties and broke down the previously formalised fashion into an accessible, youthful movement.